Welcome

Welcome to the DIY Diagnostics stream, a part of the Freshman Research Initiative at the University of Texas at Austin.

Research

The DIY lab works on both lab-wide and individual research projects.

Student Experience

Take a look at the DIY Blog to learn more about what makes our student researchers special.

Our Vision

Supporting student researchers in developing health, environmental, and application-based diagnostics.

Our Vision

The DIY Diagnostics Stream is part of the Freshman Research Initiative, a program that teaches students science through independent research experiences, in the College of Natural Sciences at the University of Texas at Austin. We are part of the do-it-yourself (DIY) health diagnostics revolution, developing diagnostic tests and building visual interfaces to improve patient health.

Faculty Leaders

Dr. Tim Riedel

Dr. Tim Riedel

Research Educator, DIY Diganostics

I have a diverse background in developing detection platforms.  This includes working with classical optical detectors, two-component signal transduction pathways, fluorescent protein expression, respirometers, and most recently quantitative PCR.  I’m excited to join the FRI and look forward to seeing what the students develop.

Dr. Andy Ellington

Dr. Andy Ellington

Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Professor

Website: ellingtonlab.org 

The Ellington Lab is a biotechnology lab that engineers nucleic acids and proteins for biomedical and other applications. Nucleic acid biosensors (aptamers, ribozymes) and nucleic acid circuits (DNA computers) are being harnessed to diagnostic applications, especially for point-of-care diagnostics in resource-poor settings and for facile tumor detection.

Dr. Pradeep Ravikumar

Dr. Pradeep Ravikumar

Computer Science Assistant Professor

Website: cs.utexas.edu/~pradeepr

I lead the Statistical Machine Learning Group at the Department of Computer Science at the University of Texas, Austin.

Projects

In the Spring 2014 semester, 34 freshmen along with 7 upper-division mentors completed a series of skill development exercises that produced authentic data on a wide range of topics including the diversity of the student’s oral microbiome, the public health of the creek on UT campus, and the diagnostic potential of molecular techniques on saliva.

Collaborators

The DIY Diagnostics FRI stream is made possible thanks to the continuous financial support of Bob and Cathy O'Rear.  Additionally, DIY has a strong history of collaboration with labs, companies, agencies, foundations, and other stakeholders who have generously donated money, expertise, or reagents to the students of DIY.

Texas Memorial Museum

Texas Memorial Museum

We are grateful to the Texas Memorial Museum for sponsoring 2 summer fellowships under the Joseph Jones Life on Waller Creek endowment.  Additionally, TMM has sponsored numerous undergraduate research awards at the Undergraduate Research Forum.

Ellington Lab

Ellington Lab

The success of the DIY Diagnostics stream research is in no small part due to the continuous support of the Ellington Lab.

Bob and Cathy O’Rear

The DIY Diagnostics FRI stream is made possible thanks to the continuous financial support of  Bob and Cathy O’Rear.

Contributors

Contributors

The DIY Diagnostics Stream is made possible thanks to a generous donation from Bob and Cathy O’rear.

DIY is supported by the Freshman Research Initiative and the University of Texas at Austin.

Apps

Students researchers learn basic coding principles and create web-based mobile apps.  Smart phones possess powerful diagnostic potential with their computational power, communication capabilities, sensors, and image processing power.   We aim to leverage these powers into useful products.  Below are a few of our more developed products.  These apps should work on a computer or mobile device and do not require any installation.  These are beta level apps that may have flaws and, of course, should not be used for any real medical diagnoses.